Film Noir at Twenty Four Frames Per Seconds Review

book-cover_dsc_0583-006Ivan G. Shreve Jr. 0f Thrilling Days of Yesteryear reviews my e-book, Film Noir at Twenty Four Frames Per Second.

http://thrillingdaysofyesteryear.blogspot.com/2016/09/book-review-film-noir-at-twenty-four.html

The e-book is available at Amazon.com.

https://www.amazon.com/FIlm-Noir-Twenty-Frames-Second-ebook/dp/B00JZCDPEW/ref=asap_bc?ie=UTF8#nav-subnav

Doctor X (1932) Michael Curtiz

doctor-x-movie-poster-1932-1010524764A grisly mass murderer who is known as the “Full Moon Killer,” his victims are always attacked when the moon is full, is on the loose in New York City. The only clue the police have is that the killer must have a medical background. Doctor Xavier, aka Doctor X, (Lionel Atwell) and his staff at a local medical institute have become the main suspects since the victims are not only strangled but cannibalized. The good doctor convinces the police to let him conduct an in house investigation of his staff for 48 hours so as not to stain the reputation of the institute. They agree. Continue reading

Tab Hunter Confidential (2015) Jeffrey Schwarz

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Tab Hunter Confidential is an insightful and personal look at a man who despite the Hollywood system managed to find a path to inner peace and happiness. His honestly and sense of self come clearly through. The film is also an excellent look at the Hollywood system’s inner workings into the making of a star and the secrets that are buried. We learn how he was groomed for stardom as the clean cut, boy next door type. His face appeared on the cover of hundreds and hundreds of fan magazines. He dated beautiful starlets including Natalie Wood. He appeared in hit films and recorded number one charting records. Yet, Tab Hunter was not real. Continue reading

Blackboard Jungle (1955) Richard Brook

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The pounding beat of Billy Haley’s Rock Around the Clock as the screen darkens got teens of the day up and dancing in the aisles. Theater owners in various cities throughout the country were nervous. Some theaters shut off the sound system during those opening credits fearing teens would quickly get out of control.  Censors, parents groups, religious groups and law enforcement all had their say in speaking out against the film. One censor in Memphis, called the film, “the vilest picture I have ever seen in twenty six years as a censor.” Rock Around the Clock was original released in mid-1954 by Haley as a B-side to the song Thirteen Women (And the Only Man in Town). It was not until director Richard Brooks wanted the song for the film’s opening and closing credits that it rocked to the top of the charts selling more than two million copies. Rock Around the Clock was not the first rock and roll record, nor was it the first hit. It was the first to hit number one on the record charts. Its social impact was massive, helping pave the way for another southern boy, a sexy, better looking boy than the chubby, curly twirled haired Haley, to explode on to the national scene. Despite the film’s opening and closing credits filled with the early rock classic most of the soundtrack is jazz. Continue reading

8 By 8 By 8 – A Small Celebration

Twenty Four Frames was started eight years ago this month. It wasn’t much and as I looked back at some of the post I wrote back then they came across as pretty bad.  I’ve grown, me thinks, as has the blog. As sort of a small celebration, for lack of a better term, I have come up with a list of films I am calling 8 by  8 by 8. Eight years, eight lists and eight films on each lists. The films are not in any particular order, but they do represent some of my favorites in each group. Some of the films selected could have easily fell into two categories. For example, A Face in the Crowd which I included in my Journalism/Media category could easily fit into the politics group. The same could be said for All the President’s Men. I wanted to listed a different film in each category, so I resisted the temptation of repeating.

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The Cameraman (1928) Edward Sedgwick

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The Cameraman is an ode to the world of filmmaking. Like Sherlock Jr. this is a film about an artist looking inward at himself and his art. It was Keaton’s first film for MGM and not directed by him. However, while officially directed by Edward Sedgwick, Keaton’s foot prints are all over the film.  Buster, who liked to improvise, was forced by the MGM honchos to have a completed script along with all the jokes and pratfalls worked out in advance. Still, there is a feeling that Keaton managed to work in some inspiring improvisational moments during the making of the film. This despite all the corporate overseeing and demands. The Cameraman ranks up there with Keaton’s best work. The corporate interference was sadly a sign of things to come. Continue reading

The Real James Dean – Book Review & Interview with Ed. Peter L. Winkler

 

The Real James Dean Book Cover   Released earlier this month, The Real James Dean: Intimate Memories from Those Who Knew Him Best is a collection of previously published articles written by Dean’s family, friends, co-workers and professional contemporaries, in other words, by those who really knew the rebel icon. Many of the articles have been unavailable since they were first published, some as far back as more than sixty years ago. They cover his entire short life from his childhood days in Indiana until his untimely death on September 30, 1955 at the age of twenty-four. Edited by Peter. L. Winkler (Dennis Hopper: The Wild Ride of a Hollywood Rebel)  the book reveals an individual of complexity, admired by some and despised by others, but always fascinating. Continue reading