Eyes of Laura Mars (1978) Irvin Kershner

eyes3Some movies, well actually a lot movies, are flawed, but you like them anyway. There are reasons that even though you know the movie doesn’t work, it connects with you. When Eyes of Laura Mars came out in 1978 I was excited. On paper it had a lot going for it; a script by the then hot and upcoming John Carpenter, there was Faye Dunaway, still hot with recent hits like Chinatown, Network and Three Days of the Condor, just behind her, and most personally  for myself, the main character was a photographer.  Continue reading

3:10 to Yuma (1957) Delmer Daves

310Yuma1957FordHefflinThere is a moral compass to 3:10 to Yuma that some may find, sadly, a bit dated. We have a man who stands up for what he believes in; what he believes is morally the right thing to do. There is a similarity to High Noon. Like Gary Cooper’s Will, Van Heflin’s Dan is one man, basically all alone (he does have one alcoholic townie who stays with him, but is killed before the final shootout), fighting off a coming evil as the rest of the town decides to give up, run and hide. Time is another element the two films have it common. For Gary Cooper, there a high noon deadline when his former adversary, recently released from prisoner, is expected to arrive in town on the noon train. For Van Heflin, it’s also a train arriving at 3:10 that forces a final confrontation. In both films, clocks or watches are constantly seen building the tension as the deadlines to a deadly shootout come closer. Continue reading

Richard Avedon and Funny Face

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Richard Avedon was one of the best known and most influential portrait and fashion photographers of his day. He changed the concept of what was fashion photography and how it was presented. He has remains an artistic hero to many, right to this day. Born in 1923, in New York City, Avedon’s parents were both in the fashion business. His father, Jacob Avedon, owned and ran Avedon’s Fifth Avenue, a clothing store. With his family background, young Richard took an early interest in fashion and began photographing outfits from his father’s store. When he was twelve years old, Richard became a member of the Camera Club at the Young Men’s Hebrew Association. Continue reading

Framed (1947) Richard Wallace

framed1947Framed is James M. Cain light. It’s Double Indemnity and The Postman Always Rings Twice, shaken and stirred. All the ingredients are there, the protagonist, the sap of a guy falling hard for a duplicitous femme fatale who crosses and double crosses anyone who gets in her way. There’s also the dame’s lover, a debonair, adulterous, underhanded white-collar thief masquerading as a model citizen. Continue reading

The Window (1949) Ted Tetzlaff

windowBased on a short story (The Boy Cried Murder) by the reclusive, alcoholic and prolific writer, Cornell Woolrich, The Window is a claustrophobic tight little thriller filled with fire escapes and old tenement buildings that dramatically frame this tale of a young boy, a compulsive teller of tales, who witnesses a murder on a hot urban city night…and no one believes him. Continue reading

A “Jaws” 4th of July

Jaws Beach RunI can’t help but not be very surprised by the reaction from authorities in North Carolina after the recent increase in shark attacks – “The beaches will remain open.” After hearing this, the first thought that came into my head was Jaws. The local politicians and business owners in Spielberg’s classic film reacted exactly the same way. It’s the 4th of July weekend, one of the biggest moneymaking times of the year. Closing the beaches will ruin the local economy. Public safety, sure that’s needed, but hey, business first. North Carolina has already experienced seven shark attacks this year. Add in the three attacks that occurred in South Carolina, and that puts the two neighboring states at ten. On average, the two Carolina’s combined normally have about six or seven attacks all year. Continue reading

Let Us Live (1939) John Brahm

let_us_live2With Henry Fonda in the lead role of an innocent man convicted and sentenced to die in the electric chair, this 1939 film brings to mind Alfred Hitchcock’s better known and similar themed work, The Wrong Man. And like his character in Hitchcock’s film, he cooperates with the police, since he has nothing to hide, only to find himself arrested, and convicted, for a crime, he did not commit. In this case murder. Continue reading