Easy Living (1937) Mitchell Leisen

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     Wit. Such a simple word and yet it is so hard to come by in the movies or anywhere else for that matter. If you have been following my blog you will notice I have recently been watching a few films written and or directed by Preston Sturges. What has attracted me to Sturges is that simple three-letter word. His films are full of it. A rare commodity, only found in a handful of films by such filmmakers as Billy Wilder, Ernest Lubitsch and more recently Woody Allen. In a film world full of Will Ferrell, Adam Sandler and Jim Carrey movies, wit is at a premium.  While I have enjoyed a Will Ferrell or Jim Carrey movie here and there, it was certainly not for any kind of cleverness or wit.  

 easy-living-dvd   This all leads to a 1937 film written by Sturges and directed by Mitchell Leisen called “Easy Living.” A bright and charming movie bursting with tons of that three letter word. The film stars the superb comedic actress Jean Arthur as Mary Smith, a young woman who literally has a fur coat dropped on her head as she rides a double decker bus in Manhattan while on her way to work. This was a result of a fight between Bank Financier J.B. Ball (Edward Arnold) aka “The Bull of Wall Street” and his wife Jenny ((Mary Nash). Ball. Fed up with his wife’s extravagant spending J. B.throws Jenny’s latest purchase, a $58,000 fur coat, off the penthouse landing and right onto Mary’s head riding on the bus below. When they meet later in the film, Mary tries to give the coat back but Ball tells her to keep it, plus he buys her a new hat since her old one was crushed when the coat landed on her head. This incident sparks a series of  incidents that result in Mary being fired from her clerical job at a magazine. It also gives the impression to many people, especially to Mr. Louis Louis, the owner of the Hotel Louis, and in debt to Banker Ball, that Mary is Ball’s mistress. As a result, Louis Louis now invites Mary to live in the hotel penthouse free of charge, thinking Ball will surely not foreclose on his hotel if his mistress is living there. Before she knows it, Mary is being offered free cars and jewelry from other customers indebted to Ball. Essentially, still broke and no food in her penthouse kitchen, Mary goes to the Automat diner for a cheap meal. Here’s she meets John Ball Jr. (Ray Milland) who not wanting to live off his father’s money is working at the Automat. Mary is unaware of John Jr.’s background and thinks of him as just another poor working Joe. When John spots Mary eating very little, he attempts to give her some free food and is caught by the store security. A free for all breaks out when Ball Jr. and the security guard get into a tussle.  Without giving too much more away let me say that the incidents just keep piling on including a potential  crash of the stock market.

“Easy Living” is a delightfully swift comedy set during the depression and it must have been amusing and maybe even hopeful to depression audiences as Sturges takes plenty of pokes at the upper class and their so called “problems.” As with many of Sturges films,  written or directed, there is a combination of high verbal wit and low level slapstick. The fight scenes in the Automat are pure laugh out loud funny.

Jean Arthur is charming as Mary Smith and makes the entire movie a joy to watch. Arthur was at the beginning of the peak years of her career. Only two years earlier, she starred with Edward G. Robinson in John Ford’s amusing “The Whole Town’s Talking.” The following year in 1936, she would make her first film with director Frank Capra in “Mr. Deeds Goes to Town.” Two other Capra classics would follow, “You Can’t Take it With You”, and “Mr. Smith Goes to Washington” in 1938 and 1939, respectively. Among Arthur’s other works are C.B. DeMille’s “The Plainsman”, Howard Hawk’s “Only Angels Have Wings”, Frank Borzage “History is Made at Night”, Billy Wilder’s “A Foreign Affair”, and three films with George Stevens,  “Talk of the Town”,  “The More the Merrier” and her final film “Shane.”  Shy and reclusive, Arthur prematurely retired from acting, though she did make sporadic appearances on TV and some theater work. The theater work usually ended with disastrous results due to her shyness and severe bouts of stage fright.   John Oller in his biography of Arthur writes about one of  Ms. Arthur’s disastrous theater attempts, the 1967 Broadway production of “The Freaking Out of Stephanie Blake”, which closed during previews.  The production was hindered with props that did not work, pot-smoking stagehands and actors who did not show up for work. According to the author, in one incident Arthur got down on her knees and begged the preview audience to let her leave the stage.  Nevertheless, Arthur’s work on the screen is memorable and should be better appreciated today than it is. Along with Carole Lombard, Arthur represents the quintessential screwball  heroine, spirited, confident and uniquely American.   easy_living

   Arthur’s co-star, Edward Arnold, as the magnate J.B. Ball is full of himself and is the source of much of the slapstick humor in the film. Though he died at a relatively young 66 years old, his career spans 50 years in film dating back to 1916. Ray Milland as Mary’s love interest and J.B.’s son holds his own and has some incredible funny scenes. When he made “Easy Living”, Milland’s career was on the verge of becoming a full-blown star.  Also, in the cast is William Demarest, who would become a regular member of  Sturges stock company. Demarest plays a gossip columnist here who is responsible for spreading  the rumors about Mary being J.B.’s mistress.

Credit should also be given to director Mitchell Leisen, who despite a career that has been criticized by both Sturges and Billy Wilder is responsible for some respectable films,. In additions to “Easy Living” Leisen directed “No Man of Her Own”, Hold Back the Dawn”, “Remember the Night” and “Midnight.”  “Easy Living” is a wonderful screwball comedy that should be on everyone’s ‘to watch list.’

 Here’s a clip from  Easy Living and here is here is another.

5 comments on “Easy Living (1937) Mitchell Leisen

  1. R. D Finch says:

    Thanks for bringing attention to the wonderful Jean Arthur, one of my very favorite Hollywood actresses from the Golden Age. There was nobody quite like her, with that squeaky, girlish voice and her one-word catchphrase: “Say!” My favorite performance is “The More the Merrier,” the only role that ever got her an Oscar nomination. How did she miss out getting nominations for all those Capra movies? Two other Arthur films worth watching are “The Devil and Miss Jones” and “Too Many Husbands,” a variation on the Enoch Arden story (like “My Favorite Wife”), with Arthur torn between new husband Melvyn Douglas and shipwrecked husband Fred MacMurray and a most unusual resolution to her dilemma.You didn’t mention that the part of Billie Dawn in the play “Born Yesterday” was written for her but for some reason, either illness or stage fright, her understudy, Judy Holliday, went on instead, and that was that. I remember watching “Born Yesterday” on TV with my mother and she asked me if that was Jean Arthur, so similar was Holliday to her.

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  2. John Greco says:

    R.D.
    I was unaware of the “Born Yesterday” connection, thanks for the input. What I like about Arthur is her “realness.” She actually seems like a real person, attractive, funny, and approachable. There is a real down to earth quality that comes through in her acting.

    I am deficient in seeing some of her films. I recently missed the opportunity to watch “Too Many Husbands” when it was on TCM not too long ago. Also, need to catch up on “The Devil and Miss Jones”, “History is Made at Night” and “The More the Merrier.”

    An interesting note I came across on IMDB is that one of Arthur’s silent film roles included a small part in Buster Keaton’s silent feature “Seven Chances.” Thank goodness sound films soon came along otherwise we would have been deprived of that unique voice.

    Thanks again for you input!!!

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  3. A friend of mine had this hard to find movie in her collection several years ago and when I saw it, my admiration for the zany Jean Arthur just swelled all the more. Sure, she’s great in Mr. Smith and Mr. Deeds but there are so many other great films, like this one, where she just sparkles.
    Great post!

    Rupert Alistair
    movieclassicsdigest.blogspot.com

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  4. John Greco says:

    thanks Rupert!

    Jean Arthur is not as appreciated today as she should be. A terrific comedic actress who rivals Carole Lombard. I recently saw her in “The Devil and Miss Jones” which I also wrote about here. If you have not seen this film you should when you get the chance.

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  5. […] when directors changed his scripts, in particular Mitchell Leisen who directed two of his works, “Easy Living” and “Remember the Night.” Sturges, in a deal with Paramount, sold “The Great […]

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