Newspaper Movie Ads of Yesteryear #4 – Halloween Horror

This is the fourth in a series as 24 Frames takes a look back at movie ads. Be sure to click on each image to enlarge.                                                                                                                         

                                                                                                                

\

Advertisements

Dancing Lady (1933) Robert Z. Leonard

The same year Warner Brothers released 42nd Street (1933) MGM came out with Dancing Lady, a backstage musical complete with a Busby Berkeley style finale. If you had to compare the two, the win would certainly go to 42nd Street, one the great Warner Brother musicals of all time. However,  Dancing Lady is entertaining if not exactly a knockout, the film can certainly hold its head high. It is just not in the stratosphere of great musicals like its better known counterpart.

The film has a pedigree cast with Joan Crawford, Clark Gable and Franchot Tone in the leading roles. Joan is Janie “Duchess” Barlow, a virtuous downtown burlesque dancer whose dream is to make it to the big time on Broadway. Slumming one evening with his multiple girlfriends is millionaire playboy Tod Newton (Franchot Tone). The Burlesque house is raided that same evening and Janie and the other girls are all hauled off into court. Tod and his entourage decide to go to court for the entertainment value of the proceedings. Once there Tod suddenly takes a surprising interest in Janie and ends up paying her bail. Continue reading

Night Editor (1946) Henry Levin

This review Contains Spoilers

Continue reading

Cool Hand Luke (1967) Stuart Rosenberg

 

Contains spoilers

One of the most famous and most often misquoted lines in “Cool Hand Luke” happens when Luke Jackson (Paul Newman) is captured after one of his escape attempts. The Captain played by Strother Martin hits Luke severely on his back sending him tumbling down a small hill. The Captain stands high above over Luke and the rest of the prisoners down below the hill.

“What we got here…is failure to communicate”

Even the newspaper ads of the day got it wrong printing “What we’ve got here is a failure to communicate”,  they printed. Of course it is catchier saying it this way and it worked. The phrase has become part of our vocabulary, and as another well-known catchphrase states “When the legend becomes fact, print the legend.” Continue reading

24 Frames at Movie Fan Fare Blog

My review of Anthony Mann’s The Man From Laramie has been given a guess blogger’s spot at Movie Fan Fare. Click here to see the review.

Play it Again, Sam (1972) Herbert Ross

“Play it Again, Sam” is the Woody Allen film that is not really a Woody Allen film but then again…it really is. Huh? This is just my convoluted way of saying that Woody did not direct the film, but and that is a big but, the script and the play the film is based is pure Mr. Allen.  So why didn’t Woody direct this film? Made in 1972, it was still early in his directing career and “Sam” is more of a character driven script than his previous directorial efforts up to that time (Bananas, Take the Money and Run and What’s Up Tiger Lily). Still unsure of himself, he agreed to have Herbert Ross direct.

I have been a big Woody Allen fan since I first saw him do his stand up act on the Ed Sullivan show back in 1965 and that same year caught him on the big screen in “What’s New Pussycat?” at the old Astor Theater on Broadway. Around the same period I discovered in a record store one of Woody’s comedy LP’s (Woody Allen Vol. 2) and scooped that up. Over the course of his stand up career Woody made three comedy LP’s (two on the Colpix label, “Woody Allen”, Woody Allen Vol. 2″ and his last, “The Third Woody Allen Album”, on Capital) that are now long out of print though they have resurfaced over the years in compilation copies under various names (Woody Allen: The Nightclub Years 1964-1968 and Woody Allen: Standup Comic) and cover art. The oddest cut on one of the original albums was a pantomime routine that lasted about two minutes. Yes, you’re reading this right, pantomime on vinyl! Two minutes of nothing but audience laughter. It was like watching a sit-com  minus the show.  Continue reading

The Films of John Lennon

In celebration of what would have been John’s 70th birthday, Twenty Four Frames presents a small tribute to The Films of John Lennon.

Lennon’s film career was a lot more than just The Beatles films. There was a solo acting role, documentaries, concert films and the avant-garde films he made with Yoko. If you include biographical films, soundtracks, archive footage, videos you are talking about hundreds.  This is just a sampling.

Here is a link to John and Yoko’s filmography.

There will be a free screening of the new documentary “Lennonyc”  in Central Park on October 9th. Click here for details. Attached here is a Village Voice article on the film and a new Lennon exhibit. PBS to broadcast “Lennonyc” beginning November 22nd (check local PBS stations for exact times).  DVD will be available on November 23rd. Click here for details. Continue reading