The Films of James Cagney and Joan Blondell

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It’s hard to imagine a better word to describe James Cagney and Joan Blondell as a team than the word moxie. They were both it up to their eyelids. Cagney the fast talking, wise cracking, smart aleck with a sly smile coming face to face with Blondell, who was just as fast with the wise cracks and added a sassiness all her own. Let’s just say Jimmy met his match. Officially, they were never a team like Tracy and Hepburn or Powell and Loy, but James Cagney and Joan Blondell made seven films together. I doubt either star ever had a more perfect fitting partner than these two had with each other. The real life Cagney/Blondell relationship, and they were good friends and never anything more, began before either ever set foot on a movie set.

They first met on Broadway back in 1929 when they both performed in a play called “Maggie the Magnificent” by George Kelly. Kelly told Cagney he got the part because he physically was what he was looking for, a “fresh mutt.” Blondell’s role called for her to be the type she would become best known for, the wisecracking dame. The play ran for only a month but the two performers became friends.  Fortunately for both, director William Keighley caught a performance of the show before it closed and liked the “young tough cookie and the strong, beautiful broad.” He recruited both for his own upcoming play, “Penny Arcade.” Within a few months the pair were back on Broadway, but it turned out be another flop running only twenty four performances. However, the play would be significant to both their future careers. Al Jolson caught the play and purchased the screen rights. He recommended to Jack Warner he take a look at it before it closed and to especially pay attention to the two supporting actors. Warner liked what he saw and signed up both Cagney and Blondell to contracts. Jolson then turned around and sold the film rights to Warners for a nice profit.

Though the made seven films together, within five years, they were not always paired on screen together. For example, in “The Crowd Roars,” Blondell was Cagney’s younger brother’s girl. However, there scenes together are some of the most electric in the film.

Sinners

SINNER’S HOLIDAY (1930)

For whatever reason, when “Penny Arcade“was brought to the screen, Warner Brothers changed the title to “Sinner’s Holiday.” Whatever it was to be called it was Cagney and Blondell’s first film together. They repeated their stage roles in the film, Jimmy as the weak brother and Joan as his tart of a girlfriend.  The stars of the film were Grant Withers and Evelyn Knapp, two pretty much forgotten names today. The film is a decent if an unexceptional programmer that only comes alive when Cagney and Blondell are on screen, especially Jimmy  who lights up every scene he appears in.

Notice the odd almost incestuous relationship Cagney’s character, Harry Delano has with his mother (Lucille LaVerne). This was the first time, though not the last, where one of Cagney’s character’s had a strange mother fixation. It would come into play again in “The Public Enemy” and still later and most famously in “White Heat.” Blondell, her hair darker than we would be use too in later films, also shines. Even in this early film, Blondell delivers a classic sassy line. When the police are asking if she was with Harry all night at the beach, her father tells her, “think of your reputation!” to which she replies, “You think of it, you worry about it more than I do.”

other-mens-women-movie-title-001

OTHER MEN’S WOMEN (1931)

Directed by William Wellman, this was Cagney and Blondell’s second film together. Jimmy had a minor role as a train engineer and Blondell was a sassy (what else?) waitress. The main leads were Grant Withers, again, as a railroad engineer who falls in love with the wife (Mary Astor) of co-worker Regis Toomey. Cagney gets to do a small dance bit in the film. Apparently, he did not care much for the film since he does not even bother mentioning it in his autobiography “Cagney by Cagney.” Blondell’s give us a touch of her perky wise talking dame she would become so well known for as Marie, a hash tossing waitress, She does have one great line in the film where she announces she A.P.O. – ain’t puttin’ out!

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THE PUBLIC ENEMY (1931)

Easily the most famous of the Cagney/Blondell films is “The Public Enemy,” a 1931 gangster flick extremely well directed by William “Wild Bill” Wellman. His superb use camera angles adds significantly to the telling of the story. This was the film that put Cagney on the map as a movie star, but not the first film where he portrayed a gangster. That would be “Doorway to Hell ” which starred mild looking Lew Ayres as a big shot and Cagney as his right hand man. As Mick LaSalle writes in Dangerous Men, “Cagney comes strutting into the movie as if someone forgot to tell him he wasn’t the lead.”  But I digress, as Tom Powers, Cagney eats up the screen. He shoves, pushes and kills his way to stardom. Most famously he heaves a grapefruit into Mae Clark’s face when she gets on his nerves after a night of heavy drinking. It’s an audacious performance that marks the true beginning of a long and brilliant screen career. Blondell’s time on the screen is minor and basically she is wasted as Matt Doyle’s (Edward Woods) girl, Power’s childhood friend. In fact, all the female parts, except for Power’s mother are small and that includes Cagney’s leading lady Jean Harlow who does not appear on screen until almost 47 minutes into the film. In truth, Harlow’s performance here is pretty bad, her speech pattern is at times a peculiar mix of odd pauses. Then there is her accent! She is suppose to be from Texas but sounds more like she is just arrived from the Lower East Side of New York. That all said, her screen presence and sex appeal already come through loud and clear.

Edward G. Robinson shocked audiences back in 1931 with his portrayal of Rico Bandello in “Little Caesar” (released earlier the same year), but he was an old softy compared to Cagney’s Tom Powers who killed anyone who double crossed him including a horse! It was also the beginning of a series of films where Cagney’s characters would beat, kick and generally man-handle women. Poor Mae Clark not only got a grapefruit  in the face in “The Public Enemy,” a few years later in “The Lady Killer,” Cagney would drag Clark by her hair and kick her of  his apartment. Still later, Virginia Mayo would be kicked off a chair in “White Heat.” On the bright side, Jimmy’s characters had ‘special relationships’ with their mothers in these same films.

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BLONDE CRAZY (1931)

The biggest question about “Blonde Crazy” is when is this film going to see a DVD release? It was released on VHS many moons ago but has yet to be seen on home video since. “Blonde Crazy” was the only film written expressly for Cagney and Blondell as a team. This also happens to be one of the sexiest pre-code films out there.  Cagney is all attitude, cocky as ever, a grifter working as a bellhop at a hotel. Blondell is a blue collar dame and the hotel’s newly hired maid thanks to Cagney who flipped for the dish the moment he saw her. The tough Blondell is warned by another experienced maid to stay away from our Jimmy. When he makes a pass at her she smacks him and all he can say is “I wouldn’t mind getting slugged by you every day.” Joanie obliges and smacks him once again. After chiseling an old man stuck on Joan, the pair becomes a team and head to the big city and bigger scams. “Blonde Crazy” is sassy, sexy and sumptuous filled with spicy dialogue and knowing looks. Blondell has one of her most revealing pre-code scenes when she soaks in a bathtub. Cagney gets to play with her underwear and not seem like a pervert while doing so. Be warned that while the film starts off as a light fun, sexy romp about two grifters, it turns darker toward the end.  The film leaves you wishing the couple made more films like this.

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THE CROWD ROARS (1932)

Directed by Howard Hawks, Cagney plays racecar driver Joe Greer who coddles his kid brother Eddie (Eric Linden) from the dames and booze that comes with the life of a race car driver. Joe is against brother Eddie following in his footsteps as a driver and even more dead set against his hooking up with Ann Scott (Joan Blondell) the feisty talking girlfriend of Lee Merrick (Ann Dvorak), Joe’s girl. Many of Cagney’s characters prone to sexual inmaturity, seeing women as second class (The Public Enmey). In this film Cagney’s Joe Greer cannot bring himself to introduce Lee to his family. She’s good enough to shack up with and he claims to be in love with her, however he also sees her, and Blondell’s Ann Scott, as nothing more than race track groupies. When Eddie meets Ann, he quickly falls head over heels in love and her with him. Upset with Lee, blaming her for Eddie and Ann hooking up, Joe dumps her.  When Joe finds out Eddie and Ann are still seeing each other, he gets drunk and confronts Ann demanding she stay away from Eddie. The brothers fight with Joe bitch slapping Eddie, telling him he’s on his own now. Joe’s drinking increases causing an horrific fire filled accident during a race that kills his best pal Spud (Frank McHugh). His grief runs deep causing him to lose his nerve on the track.  Brother Eddie has continued to race but is injured during “the big race.”  Joe shows up and takes his place overcoming his fear and wins.  The film is dated but Cagney is always a joy to watch. He and Blondell have a dramatic scene that is a turning point in the film. The final car race is at the Indianapolis Speedway.

footlight-parade

Footlights Parade (1933)

“Footlight Parade” teams Cagney and Blondell in their only musical together. Cagney is Chester Kent, a Broadway producer whose career hits a slump when the movies take over as popular entertainment. That is until he comes up with the idea of doing “prologues,” short but large scale musical production numbers that would appear before the movie. His success may be more than he can handle as producers continuously want new material, and on top of that, someone inside his organization is stealing his ideas. Blondell is Nan, his trusty and smart secretary who has fallen in love with Kent but like many man, he is too blind to see. Blondell’s Nan is the one to eventually uncover who is stealing Cagney’s ideas and cooking the books in the process. The movie is filled with great Busby Berkeley musical numbers like “Honeymoon Hotel,” “By a Waterfall,” “Sittin’ on a Backyard Fence,” and “Shanghai Lil” where we get to see Cagney dance for the first time since he did a little hoofing in “Taxi.” “Footlight Parade” is generally listed as among three of Warner Brother’s best musicals. The film is also notable for some risqué moments and dialogue like Blondell telling her roommate, who attempts to steal Cagney, that as long as there are streets she will never be out of a job. There are other references to kept men and prostitution and many of the musical numbers are as suggestive as the ladies are lightly clad.  Blondell looks great, not surprising since the cinematographer was her brand new husband, George Barnes.

James Cagney and Joan Blondell

HE WAS HER MAN (1934)

Released in 1934 just short of the start date for the newly enforced policing of Hollywood sinema, “He Was Her Man” is a slight, but entertaining drama. Both stars surprisingly play it low-key in this downbeat story, Cagney even sports a mustache. The story revolves around Flicker Hayes (Cagney) recently released from jail and seeking revenge on his former gang members who set him up to take the rap on a robbery. Not expecting Flicker to be vindictive, his former buddies include him in on a new job. However, Flicker squeals to the police resulting in one of the gang members being caught and sentenced to die in the electric chair. To avoid getting bumped off, Flicker skips town, settling in San Francisco where he meets Blondell’s Rose Lawrence, a former prostitute. She’s on her way to a small fishing village to marry Nick Gardella (Victor Jory), a respectable fisherman she met who loves her despite her immoral past. Flicker takes Rose to the fishing village figuring the small out of the way area is a good place to hide out. The two unexpectedly fall in love. Eventually, the gang find Flicker’s hideout and now want to bump off both him and Rose, figuring she knows too much.  He convinces the thugs Rose knows nothing of his past, he has been living under an alias, and if they agree to leave her alone he’ll go with them quietly. The film concludes with Flicker and his two assassins driving off toward the ocean where they will do their dirty deed. Rose marries the kindly Nick as the film comes to a rather poignant conclusion. Despite the movie’s final wedding scene, the film ends on a despondent note with Cagney’s character going off to his death. Throughout the film Cagney is subdued. Fans who like the hyperactive Jimmy will probably be disappointed. Blondell, in a rare lead role, is also fairly subdued as Rose avoiding her usual perky wise cracking style.

While both James Cagney and Joan Blondell had long and successful careers going into the 1960’s, the poignant “He Was Her Man” was their final on screen appearance together.

This article is my contribution to the CAGNEY BLOGATHON hosted by The Movie Projector. For more articles and reviews from the blogathon please click here.

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41 comments on “The Films of James Cagney and Joan Blondell

  1. Wow. I really enjoyed getting to know more about Jimmy and Joan and some half-remembered titles. Fabulous idea for the blogathon and excellently done.

    A line that’s always stuck with me is at the dance hall in “Other Men’s Women” when Jimmy tells a gal: “Baby, you look like $700 tonight, I’m tellin’ you!” Cracks me up! Nobody else could have pulled it off.

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    • John Greco says:

      Thanks Patricia! One of the great things about so many of the early pre-code films is the great dialogue which is something that is missing in many of today’s films…and of course Mr. Cagney to give it just the right delievery.

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  2. It’s really surprising that WB didn’t seem to realize what a great team it had in Cagney & Blondell. The two had the same energy and rhythm onscreen, plus they had a good physical contrast — Cagney wiry and hard, Blondell round and cuddly. They don’t seem to have been paired after the Production Code 1934 crackdown, which seems telling. There’s a kind of what-could-have-been wishful thinking about these two in regards to their screen careers. Thanks for such a comprehensive post.

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    • John Greco says:

      GOM, thanks. One of the first things I noticed in doing the research is that all their films together were done within a three year period and they never worked on screen together again. Sparks always flew (all that high energy)when they were on screen together even if as in THE CROWD ROARS where Blondell was Eric Linden’s girl.

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  3. KimWilson says:

    It is strange that they didn’t make any films together after 1934. You must have been busy, John, going through all these films. My favorite Cagney/Blondell pairing is Footlight Parade, as they get to sing & dance.

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    • John Greco says:

      Hi Kim, – FOOTLIGHT is a great musical and like all their films together the banter between hem is priceless. They not only had faces then, they had voices too! They knew how to deliver lines.

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      • Jane in Milwaukee says:

        My 3 favorite things about Footlight Parade are:
        1) The scene where Frank McHugh (who’s been whining “it can’t be done, it can’t be done!” throughout the movie) gives Cagney his umpteenth letter of resignation. Exasperated, Cagney snatches it out of his hand and yells “I accept it–you’re through!” McHugh grabs it back and bellows “Don’t you realize that means I’ll be out of a job??”
        2) That fabulous final dance with Ruby Keeler who’s Shanghai Lil. You don’t know that he’s the one who’s fallen down the stairs till he walks over to the bar and starts to sing. Their dance on the bar show what natural he is. (The finale which includes a salute to FDR is a classic over-the-top Busby Berkeley number.)
        3) The end of the movie when we hear–but not see–Cagney kiss Blondell and propose to her. Happy ending!

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      • John Greco says:

        Jane,

        All great points! I think Cagney and Blondell had some great chemistry together and that kiss we hear is a great ending. Thanks for contributing to the conversation.

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  4. Kevin Deany says:

    A terrific look at an undervalued screen team. I have a pre-record VHS tape of “Blonde Crazy” and I’ll have to give it another re-watch. I remember that one as being particularly good. I recently read a biography of Joan Blondell and they liked each other tremendously. They both were allies for each other during those six days a week, 12 hours a day shoots. No wonder they made so many films back then. They didn’t do anything else.

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    • John Greco says:

      Kevin, I read the same Blondell bio (has to be, it’s the only one) and yeah, they were very good friends and yes, the studio did keep them working as much as possible. Cagney was more of a fighter for salary increases than Blondell was. Thanks for stopping by.

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  5. R. D. Finch says:

    John, a great overview of the Cagney-Blondell films. Of the ones you cover, I’ve seen only “Footlight Parade” and “The Crowd Roars” so everything you wrote was of great interest to me. And there was some fine writing here, especially your descriptions of Blondell and her interactions with Cagney in that handful of films. She was a wonderful actress, sassy and intelligent at the same time, and very good at suggesting the sexuality behind the things she said and did onscreen. (Later she was a very good character actress, a sort of blowsier version of her younger self.) I also am of the opinion that this was a great topic that covered an aspect of Cagney’s career which isn’t well known. Before you proposed it, I had no idea that Cagney and Blondell had made so many pictures together in so short a time. Thanks for your contribution to the Cagney blogathon!

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    • John Greco says:

      Exactly Richard! In her later roles Blondell still wise cracked a lot but it came from a different older point of view. They are alway fun to watch together on screen. So far, there has been a great collection of reviews and articles for the blogathon.

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  6. Judy says:

    John, enjoyed this wonderful posting about these mainly pre-Code movies a lot – must agree that Blondell and Cagney made a great team.’The Public Enemy’ is far and away my favourite out of these as a film overall, but Blondell doesn’t get much of a role in it. I think my favourite teaming of the two of them is ‘Blonde Crazy’, which I definitely agree badly needs a DVD release – in the UK it hasn’t even been issued on VHS, so I had to buy it on import a few years back, and the picture quality is not good at all! Jimmy and Joan also work very well together in ‘Footlight Parade’.

    Out of the others here I love Cagney in ‘The Crowd Roars’ (I can’t get enough of early Hawks films) but I don’t think Blondell really gets enough scope in that. Similarly I think Blondell is excellent in ‘He Was Her Man’ but it isn’t a very good role for Cagney… and neither of them gets enough screen time in ‘Other Men’s Women’, even though I love it as a quirky early Wellman! I have a soft spot for ‘Sinners’ Holiday’ even though I find it extremely hard to understand a word Cagney is saying in some scenes! Really enjoyed your description of it – shows that he brought the mama’s boy image with him from the start, after playing this role on stage. Such a shame, again, that this one hasn’t had a DVD release. I’d really like to see it issued with the original trailer, where Cagney screams to his mother “I’m still your baby, ain’t I?’ – a line he later claimed in his autobiography that he had refused to say, but plainly he did and then got them to cut it out!

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    • John Greco says:

      Thanks Judy, My copy of BLONDE CRAZY is a bootleg I bought a few years ago. Probably copied off the VHS tape. Overall, Cagney and Blondell made a great screen couple. i only wish they had roles in film where they acted more as a real team, say like Tracy and Hepburn but you take what you can get. When you see them on screen its so obvious they worked well together that you think someone at Warners would have said, lets hook these two up more. I never saw that trailer of SINNER’S HOLIDAY with that line. Wow!

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  7. FlickChick says:

    What a wonderful post. Yes – Jimmy and Joan were aces together and, except for Ann Sheridan, he never really had a leading lady except Joan who could give as well as she got. They were a special duo and your well researched post is beautifully done. Loved it!!

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    • John Greco says:

      FlickChick thanks! Sheridan could be fiesty too thats; for sure. Her and Cagney were in one of my all time favorites -ANGELS WITH DIRTY FACES.

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  8. Sam Juliano says:

    Yes they made a great team and it’s a shame that they are often relegated to a runner up ranking when it comes to assessing their work as a team. As you note in this masterful examination John, there are ample vehicles attesting to their chemistry, and for me their work in PUBLIC ENEMY, FOOTLIGHT PARADE and BLONDE CRAZY is particularly unforgettable. Any thorough study of Cagney’s acting over his career should indeed shed some light on this pairing, and you have done a masterful job in making sure the camera’s in the right place John!

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    • John Greco says:

      Sam, I agree with your selections and would toss in THE CROWD ROARS if only for the scene that is pictured above in my article. Thanks again, my friend!

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  9. Patti says:

    Joan Blondell is almost as adorable as James Cagney is, and I always enjoy her. I find her to be delightful, which, interestingly, is how Cagney describes her in his autobiography. He said that in “Maggie the Magnificent, he met that delightful, trouping lady Joan Blondell.” I have only seen 3 of their “together” films, so I appreciate you spotlighting the others. I look forward to catching them as well.

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    • John Greco says:

      Thanks Patti and I hope you catch up with the other films. There is not a bad one in the bunch. I read Cagney’s autobio when it first came out in paperback many years ago. From what I remember he was pretty straightforward with things.

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  10. Great Post! These are some of the best Pre-Codes ever made! Blondell was the Queen of Pre-Code! Thanks, John!

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  11. John, I’m blown away at how many movies James Cagney and Joan Blondell filmed together, and what an even cooler team they could have been together if they’d had more roles as a team! I’ll have to check out more of their pre-code films, too. As something of an aside, I was also pleased to see your review of OTHER MEN’S WOMEN, since **SHAMELESS PLUG ALERT**, that’s a nice reminder that The Mary Astor Blogathon is coming early in May! 😀 **END SHAMELESS PLUG ALERT**! 🙂 But seriously, John, I very much enjoyed your entertaining, detailed post – great job, as always!

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    • John Greco says:

      Thanks Dorian. Always appreciate you stopping by. I actually was working on my submission for The Mary Astor Blogathon yesterday. I already did a previous review of my selection (Act of Violence) a while back but this will be an revised and longer (oh no!) version. Thanks again!

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  12. Like some others I never really thought “team” with them, so the long list of titles was a surprise. Think I’ve caught them all, wind up getting more of a sibling/pal type feel from the team thinking about them as a group. Not a lot of heat. Though thinking about each of them individually, we don’t usually think romance, do we? That said, I think FOOTLIGHT PARADE is my fave of the bunch, beyond its just being wonderful in general, but as a Cagney-Blondell pairing. Love Joan’s pursuit of him and Cagney’s blindness to her feelings. How can you miss that? Feel like William Powell missed Joan’s signals a few times too. Wonderful look at the pairings and great job calling in other great screen moments without going off on a total tangent … which I wouldn’t have been able to resist doing!

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  13. John Greco says:

    FOOTLIGHT is definitely one where there is a lot of interaction between the two and a you mention, Cagney’s blindness to Joan’s pursuit is very nicely done. Sparks do fly in BLONDE CRAZY which is probably the sexiest of all their films together, and as I mention, theo nly film that was written for them. Appreciat you stopping by Cliff.

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  14. What a fun post, and I haven’t seen many of these. Clearly I need to. Always enjoyed “Footlight Parade” and they clearly have a strong rapport in that one, as they clearly do in the others based upon your observations.

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    • John Greco says:

      CFB, I hope you have seen THE PUBLIC ENEMY, if not, you nee to run to you local library and get a copy, essential stuff. Most of these films pop up on TCM. The hardest one to get a copy of is BLONDE CRAZY which I keep saying here needs a DVD release.

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  15. Aurora says:

    Wonderful! Fun and informative read. I’ve seen all of these throughout the years – a few I barely remember – but you’ve made me want to see them all in order to note these two wonderful actors as they grow.

    Aurora

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  16. The Lady Eve says:

    John, I have only seen the best known of the Cagney/Blondell pictures, “The Public Enemy” and “Footlight Parade,” but really enjoyed your tour of all six films as well as your insights on their teaming. I’ll have to catch up on the other four (if all four can be found).

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    • John Greco says:

      Eve, Sorry for the delayed response. Most of these pop up on TCM now and then. The toughest one to find is BLONDE CRAZY where hopefully will see a DVD release soon.

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  17. I really enjoyed this unique entry, John — I love both Cagney and Blondell, and what better than to see them as a team! I caught part of The Crowd Roars a week or so ago, and would really like to see the whole thing — I’ve also seen part of Blonde Crazy but, for some reason, not to the end. You can bet I’ll be digging it up now!

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    • John Greco says:

      Thanks SS – Whenever they are on screen together you can see the chemistry between them. I only wish they had made more films together.

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  18. Le says:

    It is nice that hey not only were paired on screen, but did their screen debuts together and were friends in real life. I haven’t watched all the seven pairing, but the ones I’ve watched were great, they had true chemistry. I wish they were paired again in the next decades!
    Don’t forget to WATCH my contribution to the blogathon! 🙂
    Greetings!

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  19. Rachel Leona says:

    I love the A.P.O. remark!!

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  20. This is one of my fav Cagney/Blondell films, possibly my favourite. I don’t agree they were subdued. Its a good plot and they played their parts admirably and appropriately. I would recommend this movie. 4 stars.

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    • John Greco says:

      Hi Gretchen and welcome! I do think the roles were different especially fo Cagney, and as I mention, fan of Cagney who prefer a more hyper Jimmy may be disappointed. I am not saying the film is bad, it’s not, just not what some may expect.

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  21. […] G Men was directed by William Keighley, unfairly best remembered for later being pulled off of The Adventures of Robin Hood (1938) in favor of Michael Curtiz, but who wound up putting together a nice career with titles including: Bullets or Ballots (1936), The Prince and the Pauper (1937), Brother Rat (1938), Cagney again in Each Dawn I Die (1939), and again in The Fighting 69th (1940) as well as Torrid Zone (1940) and The Bride Came C.O.D. (1941). The former actor Keighley had worked with Cagney as far back as Penny Arcade, the Broadway production which originally brought Cagney and co-star Joan Blondell to the screen in the Warner Brothers adaptation Sinners’ Holiday (1930). […]

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  22. […] John at Twenty Four Frames runs through all of the Blondell/Cagney pairings on film, seven in total and all pre-Code. […]

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