Film Noir at Twenty Four Frames Per Second

A small bit of self promotion here. My first e-book Film Noir at Twenty Four Frames Per Second is now available in the Kindle version on Amazon. Twenty essays and reviews from classics like “Ace in the Hole” and “Detour” to lesser known works like “Cause for Alarm” and “Roadblock” are looked at. Within the next few weeks or less I hope to put out a Nook version over at the Barnes and Noble site. Here is the link…http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00JZCDPEW
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Peeping Tom – A Look at Mark Lewis

Carl Boehm

Filmmakers and photographers have one obsession in common. Well, they actually have more than one. However, the one obsession I ‘d like to point out here, and I have spoken about this before, is they like to watch! Just like the audience, everyone in the audience, no exceptions, they like to look, they are voyeurs. Come on, let’s face it, we all like watch and the safest way to watch others is by watching a movie or looking at a photograph.

We have seen voyeurism in many films as diverse as Hitchcock’s “Rear Window,” Michelangelo Antonioni’s “Blow Up” and Brian DePalma’s early black comedy “Greetings.” Taken to the extreme, voyeurism leads to invasion of privacy and even worst, murder as it does in Michael Powell’s 1960 film “Peeping Tom.”

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Rear Window – A Second Look

 

still-of-james-stewart-in-rear-window-(1954)-large-picture The previous time James Stewart and Alfred Hitchcock worked together was on Rope; an experimental piece for Hitch that was considered a failure by most critics of the time. Stewart himself was not happy with the picture, or with the role, which he felt was not right for him. Additionally, there was the fact Rope was not a financial box office success. Some cities even requested cuts before it was to be shown. In Chicago it was banned outright. This was most likely because the storyline was a bit too close to the real life Loeb-Leopold case of the 1920’s.  Subsequently, when Hitchcock called about Rear Window, Stewart was hesitant to accept, especially after hearing that, like Rope, the film would take place mostly on one set. Furthermore, he would be confined to a wheelchair for the entire film.

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Book Review: The Strange Birth, Short Life and Sudden Death of Justice Girl

justicegirl The Hollywood Blacklist was at its height in the mid-50’s. Writers, directors and actors were all scrutinized for any sign of “un-American” activity, real or imagined. It was a dark time when people could not talk freely, express a point of view, living in fear that they could lose their livelihood. Julian David Stone’s new novel, “The Strange Birth, Short life and Sudden Death of Justice Girl” takes us back to those dark days in a wild ride that is both frightening and funny.

The time is 1955, live TV is the order of the day and the center of it all is in New York. TV writer Jonny Dirby is about to be fired by the network because he won’t sign a loyalty oath and is quickly branded a commie. As a final act of revenge against the network he writes a last minute new character into the script that he believes will ruin the show he use to work on. But it backfires and instead ignites an explosion of audience excitement giving birth to  super heroine Justice Girl, a sort of female version of Superman.

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The Take2 Guide to Steven Spielberg

The new e-book, The Take2 Guide to Steven Spielberg, which includes an article by yours truly (The Summer of Jaws), is now available in all e-Book formats.spielberg_guide5_ss_697da926-bab1-44fe-83dd-df70360208c0_1024x1024 The book includes articles, interviews and reviews covering Spielberg’s entire career and features more than 60 contributors including Jonathan Rosenbaum, Joseph McBride. Matt Zoller Seitz, Tom Carson and James Bernardinelli as well as fellow film bloggers Sam Juliano, Joel Bocko,Ed Howard and others.  Edited by fellow blogger and filmmaker Adam Zanzie.

Attached below is a press release…

http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/04/prweb11719016.htm