Gold Diggers of 1933 on TCM – Feb. 9th

gold-diggers-of-1933-forgotten-manThe classic Depression era musical, Gold Diggers of 1933, will be on TCM Thursday February 9th at 10:15PM (eastern). Directed by Mervyn LeRoy, with a little help from Busby Berkeley, the film stars Joan Blondell, Ruby Keeler and Aline McMahon as three out of work chorus girls sharing a cheap apartment all looking for work, love and money. Work comes with the help of rival Ginger Rogers who tells the ladies about a new show being readied for Broadway by producer Ned Sparks.

Down below is an excerpt from my e-book, Lessons in the Dark, where you can read more about  Gold Diggers of 1933 and other classic films. Available at Amazon. Continue reading

My Best Films of 2016

 The Top Ten

After removing the layers and layers of bottom feeding comic book fantasies, bowel retching sequels, mindless comedies and overblown blockbuster trash catering to the mindless masses, 2016 still managed to turn out to be a decent year in film with thoughtful films that actually say something, inform and yet still managed to entertain. Manchester by the Sea is my top film of the year. It’s a strong painful and tragic tale of deep emotional guilt that somehow manages to still include some nice bits of humor. Casey Affleck’s performance is a knock out punch that, like Denzel Washington’s and Viola Davis’ performances in Fences, reveals multiple layers of emotions staying with you long after you leave the theater. For me, a masterpiece. Continue reading

Private Property (1960) Leslie Stevens

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Private Property is an independent film from 1960 about two young and dangerous drifters who spy on and eventually work their way into the home of a beautiful young married woman. At the time of its release, the film was condemned by the Catholic Legion of Decency for its lascivious themes and violence. Thought to have been lost for many years, Private Property is a voyeuristic journey into the minds of the morally corrupt. Corey Allen, of Rebel without a Cause fame and later a TV director, and Warren Oates star as the two vicious losers out for a good time at any expense.

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7th Annual 24 Frames 10 Best Classic Films Watched…For the First Time

With the recent passing of Debbie Reynolds and Carrie Fisher, the list of movie stars living from the classic era continues to dwindle. Fortunately, for those of us left behind we’ll always have them all to enjoy and remember on TCM and other venues for classic film. On a brighter note, Kirk Douglas recently celebrated his 100th birthday in December and we wish him many more. Continue reading

By Sidney Lumet (2016) Nancy Buirski

by_sidney_lumetAlong with Martin Scorsese, Roman Polanski, Brian DePalma, Arthur Penn, Francis Ford Coppola, John Frankenhiemer and Woody Allen, Sidney Lumet was one of the filmmakers from the period roughly beginning in the late 1950’s through the late 1970’s that shaped and formed my love of cinema. With the imminent demise of the studio system, that period was a significant turning point in American film. Overblown, over budgeted Hollywood productions and television would help end the Hollywood Studios stranglehold. A new order was on the horizon as were a new legion of filmmakers and Sidney Lumet was right in the mix. Continue reading

Eight Days a Week: The Touring Years (2016) Ron Howard

photo-the-beatles-eight-days-a-week-the-touring-years-186676If you have been or are a diehard admirer of The Beatles, like myself, you won’t find much that is new in Ron Howard’s recent documentary despite claims to the contrary. There are a few pieces of footage here and there, but if you have watched the definitive, ten hour, Beatles Anthology, or any other of the many documentaries like the Maysles Brothers What’s Happening! The Beatles in the U.S.A. (1964), The Compleat Beatles (1982), the multiple releases of The Ed Sullivan Show performances or more recent works like Scorsese’s George Harrison: Living in the Material World (2011) and The U.S. vs. John Lennon (2006) along with the many bootleg copies of concert tapes that have surfaced over the years, Eight Days a Week: The Touring Years, even with the participation of Apple, brings little that you have not seen already to the table. Continue reading

Gunfight at the O.K. Corral (1957) John Sturges

gunfight-jpgOne of the earliest films depicting Wyatt Earp, Doc Holiday and the gunfight at the OK Corral was a 1932 work called Law and Order. While the character’s names were changed, the film told the tale, fictitious as it was, of the infamous Tombstone shootout. Since the making of that film there have been numerous others detailing, correctly or incorrectly, generally more the latter, the story of the battle between the Earp Brothers and the Clanton’s’ at the OK Corral. In 1939, there was Frontier Marshal with Randolph Scott as Earp and Cesar Romero as Doc Holiday. According to Jon Tuska in his 1976 tomb on the Western film (The Filming of the West), it was this script that was given to John Ford and was used as the basis for his My Darling Clementine. Continue reading