Hard-Boiled Hammett

John Greco Author/Photographer

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Considered one of the founding fathers of hard-boiled fiction, if not the founding father, Dashiell Hammett is must reading for anyone interested in tough guy crime fiction. Detective fiction before Hammett came along the likes of Agatha Christie: conventional, polite detectives where few got their hands down and dirty were standard. Hammett changed all that. His Sam Spade was a cynical outsider who lived by his own personal code. The streets of crime were tough and Spade and other Hammett characters walked them with a new literary style. They called it “hard-boiled” and as The New York Times in their obituary, christened Hammett he was the dean of the “so called” hard-boiled school of detective fiction.

Hammett served in World War I, where he was rewarded by contracting tuberculosis. During his recovery, he met a nurse, Josephine Dolan, who became his wife. For a few years, Hammett became a Pinkerton…

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Anniversaries: New CMBA eBook

John Greco Author/Photographer

I have been working on editing a new collection of film essays for the Classic Movie Blog Association’s  (CMBA) ninth eBook. Each book has its own theme, Banned and Blacklisted, Underseen and Underrated, and Hollywood on Hollywood to name a few. This book is no different. The subject is Anniversaries. Why Anniversaries, you ask? Well, in October of last year the CMBA celebrated its 10th anniversary, so it seemed fitting.

Anniversaries Book Cover

The CMBA began in 2009 as a dream of Rick Armstrong who blogs as the Classic Film and TV Cafe. He was the organization’s first President and its guiding light. Today, there are close to 90 members and going strong.

This book contains 10 essays from celebrating how Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid and other films from 1969 bridged the Old And New Hollywood to how the Spanish Flu of 100 years ago affected the…

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New Interview!

I am interviewed by Rick Armstrong of the Classic Film and TV Cafe. You can read the interview here!  The Late Show and Other Tales of Celluloid Malice is available at Amazon as both an eBook and Paperback.The Late Show IMG_4005

The Late Show is Now Playing!

John Greco Author/Photographer

IT’S HERE!  Today my latest collection of short stories, The Late Show and Other Tales of Celluloid Malice, is available for purchase on Amazon as both an eBook and paperback.

The Late Show Poster Collage2

Eight dark short stories all with two things in common – Movies and Malice! Murder, revenge, greed and more are now playing.  The stories include:

The Late Show Kindlw Cover-004The Late Show

I Ain’t So Tough

Six Shooter

The Green Light

The Movie Club

The Cabin

The Butcher’s Kid

Benny and Slaughter

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Hal (2018)

Hal

The studio is the enemy of the artist! – Norman Jewsion talking to Hal Ashby

When they talk about the great filmmakers of the 1970s, names like Martin Scorsese, Francis Ford Coppola, Robert Altman, Sidney Lumet, and Brian DePalma are always mentioned. Yet, none of these artists made as many great or important films within the decade as Hal Ashby (arguably Robert Altman did as many). Ashby’s 70s work included The Landlord, Harold and Maude, The Last Detail, Shampoo, Bound forby’s Glory, Coming Home, and Being There.  All these works were made within that one decade. No other filmmaker of the period had as many excellent films within a ten year period.

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Hal Ashby was a rebel with a cause. His work was filled with social commentary on racism, The Vietnam War, the ruling class, the military and more.  He loved film and filmmaking more than anything else in life. He fought the fight to keep his work untouched by the corporate bad guys. In Amy Scott’S 2018 documentary, “Hal,” reflects the director’s roguish, anarchic and independent artistic nature. Ashby’s first claim to fame was as a film editor mostly working with director and good friend Norman Jewison on films like The Cincinnati Kid, The Russians Are Coming, The Russians are Coming, In the Heat of the Night, for which he won an Oscar, and The Thomas Crown Affair. But what Ashby wanted to do most was direct and he got his opportunity with The Landord, a film far ahead of its time. Sadly, Ashby’s run of excellent work did not extend into the 1980s. Plagued by rumors of cocaine use and fighting with studio heads both his artistic and personal health suffered.  Ashby died of cancer in 1988 he was only 59 years old.

Pre-Order The Late Show and Other Tales of Celluloid Malice

John Greco Author/Photographer

My new book, The Late Show and Other Tales of Celluloid Malice will be available on March 3rd. You can now pre-order the ebook on Amazon for immediate delivery on the publication date. A paperback edition will also be available.

The Late Show Kindlw Cover-004

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I Ain’t So Tough

John Greco Author/Photographer

Frankie Bosco’s running from the cops. He needs to hide. As he scurries along a busy street Frankie passes a movie theater showing two classic James Cagney gangster films. It’s perfect! He can hide in the theater until dark and things cool down. Undercover of the night would a better time to make his getaway. In the theater, Frankie’s safe for now or so he thinks!

I Ain’t So Tough is one of seven crime stories with a cinematic flavor included in my forthcoming collection, The Late Show and Other Tales of Celluloid Malice.

Roaring

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