Peeping Tom – A Look at Mark Lewis

Carl Boehm

Filmmakers and photographers have one obsession in common. Well, they actually have more than one. However, the one obsession I ‘d like to point out here, and I have spoken about this before, is they like to watch! Just like the audience, everyone in the audience, no exceptions, they like to look, they are voyeurs. Come on, let’s face it, we all like watch and the safest way to watch others is by watching a movie or looking at a photograph.

We have seen voyeurism in many films as diverse as Hitchcock’s “Rear Window,” Michelangelo Antonioni’s “Blow Up” and Brian DePalma’s early black comedy “Greetings.” Taken to the extreme, voyeurism leads to invasion of privacy and even worst, murder as it does in Michael Powell’s 1960 film “Peeping Tom.”

Continue reading

Rear Window – A Second Look

 

still-of-james-stewart-in-rear-window-(1954)-large-picture The previous time James Stewart and Alfred Hitchcock worked together was on Rope; an experimental piece for Hitch that was considered a failure by most critics of the time. Stewart himself was not happy with the picture, or with the role, which he felt was not right for him. Additionally, there was the fact Rope was not a financial box office success. Some cities even requested cuts before it was to be shown. In Chicago it was banned outright. This was most likely because the storyline was a bit too close to the real life Loeb-Leopold case of the 1920’s.  Subsequently, when Hitchcock called about Rear Window, Stewart was hesitant to accept, especially after hearing that, like Rope, the film would take place mostly on one set. Furthermore, he would be confined to a wheelchair for the entire film.

Continue reading

Book Review: The Strange Birth, Short Life and Sudden Death of Justice Girl

justicegirl The Hollywood Blacklist was at its height in the mid-50’s. Writers, directors and actors were all scrutinized for any sign of “un-American” activity, real or imagined. It was a dark time when people could not talk freely, express a point of view, living in fear that they could lose their livelihood. Julian David Stone’s new novel, “The Strange Birth, Short life and Sudden Death of Justice Girl” takes us back to those dark days in a wild ride that is both frightening and funny.

The time is 1955, live TV is the order of the day and the center of it all is in New York. TV writer Jonny Dirby is about to be fired by the network because he won’t sign a loyalty oath and is quickly branded a commie. As a final act of revenge against the network he writes a last minute new character into the script that he believes will ruin the show he use to work on. But it backfires and instead ignites an explosion of audience excitement giving birth to  super heroine Justice Girl, a sort of female version of Superman.

Continue reading

The Take2 Guide to Steven Spielberg

The new e-book, The Take2 Guide to Steven Spielberg, which includes an article by yours truly (The Summer of Jaws), is now available in all e-Book formats.spielberg_guide5_ss_697da926-bab1-44fe-83dd-df70360208c0_1024x1024 The book includes articles, interviews and reviews covering Spielberg’s entire career and features more than 60 contributors including Jonathan Rosenbaum, Joseph McBride. Matt Zoller Seitz, Tom Carson and James Bernardinelli as well as fellow film bloggers Sam Juliano, Joel Bocko,Ed Howard and others.  Edited by fellow blogger and filmmaker Adam Zanzie.

Attached below is a press release…

http://www.prweb.com/releases/2014/04/prweb11719016.htm

Bambi (1942) Our First Lesson in Grief

707-4-bambi

By Lily McCann 

© Lily McCann 2014

   

When you ask most children what the most traumatising film of their childhood was, Bambi (1942) is likely to get mentioned. However, the movie actually teaches us a valuable life lesson in terms of grief and how to deal with it. In fact, Disney has become renowned for telling it like it is to children and helping them to understand life’s obstacles in a straight forward and honest way, without being too graphic.

Continue reading

The Cinemas of Woody Allen

annie-hall-6BeekmanWoody Allen’s love of New York and movies  is legendary. Many times over Woody has incorporated these two loves into his films. As a consequence, Woody films are not only entertaining works of art, but have becomes historical documents of a time gone by. Woody’s location shooting on the streets of New York is well known and many of the locations; stores, buildings and cinemas are sadly no longer in existence. They are gone, destroyed for many reasons; old age, bankruptcy, outgrown their usefulness or ever worst…progress!

Over the past several decades New York’s classic movie theaters have pretty much been decimated! At one time there were many, many theaters and now the few that are left standing have been turned into churches, bingo halls, furniture stores, flea markets, left vacant or torn down. In their place today we have the cold, bland multi-plexes of modern day movie going.  At one time there were well over thirty movie theaters in the Times Square/Broadway/42nd street area of midtown. Now there are two multiplexes on 42nd Street and not one movie theater on the Broadway/7th Avenue crossroads replaced instead by Corporate America’s candy land of shops from Disney to Hershey’s to Swatch and others symbols of modern day consumerism. Once the center for the arts in America (stage, screen, television, music, nightclubs, etc.), Times Square has been turned into an glittery outdoor mall for tourist.

Fortunately, thanks to Woody Allen, many of the movie theaters that once graced New York can still be seen or at least glimpsed at in his movies. My list here is not comprehensive, but I believe I cover most of the cinemas Woody has shown in his films, from Broadway to the Upper West Side and Upper East Side of Manhattan to Brooklyn. Continue reading

Grease (1978) Randall Kleiser

Grease Sing-A-LongIt began with an idea from Jim Jacobs who thought it would be cool to do a show with 1950′s rock and roll music. He mentioned it to his friend, and fellow amateur theater associate, Warren Casey. Both men had nine to five jobs, but Casey would soon lose his job, and to pass the time he began to write what would turn out to be the pajama party scene in the finished musical. The two men got together and worked on the book and some music, and then just like in the movies, they managed to put on a show. The venue was in Chicago, a small theater called Kingston Mines. It was a low budget production with cheap painted backdrops; the cast included an unknown Marilu Henner as Marty. The show itself was still evolving, a few of the songs were there from the beginning (Beauty School Dropout, Grease Lightnin’), others would be added later. Two New York producers saw the show and thought with a few changes, but keeping its rough edges intact, the show would make for an interesting Off-Broadway production. Continue reading